The Adirondacks: For the Peakbagger

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I keep hearing about the 46 four-thousand-foot mountains in the Adirondacks of upstate New York. Judging by the photos here, which I pulled from the Internet, I’m in for a pleasant treat when I begin the quest to climb them next Spring. I’m told that most of them have marked trails leading to the summit. That sure helps.

I’m thinking that these mountains are similar to the White mountains in New Hampshire and will offer a similar hiking experience. If so, I can expect rugged terrain and challenging climbs. Afterall, the Adirondack area is the home of Lake Placid and the Winter Olympics in 1932 and 1980. The ski jumps still stand.

Many peak baggers (those who hike to mountain peaks) in the eastern half of the U.S., select peaks starting at 4,000 feet. New Hampshire has 48 four-thousand footers, and there are 68 in New England. So, it’s natural to migrate west to New York state when you are finished in New England. It will probably take me a few years to climb all of them in the Adirondacks, as I don’t plan to hike in winter. Like most things in life, and like that long Chinese march, it all begins with a first step.

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The Adirondacks: For the Peakbagger

I keep hearing about the 46 four-thousand-foot mountains in the Adirondacks of upstate New York. Judging by the photos below, which I pulled from the Internet, I’m in for a pleasant treat when I begin the quest to climb them next Spring. I’m told that most of them have marked trails leading to the summit. That sure helps.

Hiking in the Adirondack MountainsWaterfalls while backpacking in the AdirondacksHiking in the Adirondacks of opstate New YorkI’m thinking that these mountains are similar to the White mountains in New Hampshire and will offer a similar hiking experience. If so, I can expect rugged terrain and challenging climbs. Afterall, the Adirondack area is the home of Lake Placid and the Winter Olympics in 1932 and 1980. The ski jumps still stand.

Many peak baggers (those who hike to mountain peaks) in the eastern half of the U.S., select peaks starting at 4,000 feet. New Hampshire has 48 four-thousand footers, and there are 68 in New England. So, it’s natural to migrate west to New York state when you are finished in New England. It will probably take me a few years to climb all of them in the Adirondacks, as I don’t plan to hike in winter. Like most things in life, and like that long Chinese march, it all begins with a first step.

The unsigned photo of the peaks with snow was taken by Anita Green. I can’t find a photographer name for the lake photo.

The Adirondacks: For the Peakbagger

I keep hearing about the 46 four-thousand-foot mountains in the Adirondacks of upstate New York. Judging by the photos below, which I pulled from the Internet, I’m in for a pleasant treat when I begin the quest to climb them next Spring. I’m told that most of them have marked trails leading to the summit. That sure helps.

Hiking in the Adirondack MountainsWaterfalls while backpacking in the AdirondacksHiking in the Adirondacks of opstate New YorkI’m thinking that these mountains are similar to the White mountains in New Hampshire and will offer a similar hiking experience. If so, I can expect rugged terrain and challenging climbs. Afterall, the Adirondack area is the home of Lake Placid and the Winter Olympics in 1932 and 1980. The ski jumps still stand.

Many peak baggers (those who hike to mountain peaks) in the eastern half of the U.S., select peaks starting at 4,000 feet. New Hampshire has 48 four-thousand footers, and there are 68 in New England. So, it’s natural to migrate west to New York state when you are finished in New England. It will probably take me a few years to climb all of them in the Adirondacks, as I don’t plan to hike in winter. Like most things in life, and like that long Chinese march, it all begins with a first step.

The unsigned photo of the peaks with snow was taken by Anita Green. I can’t find a photographer name for the lake photo.